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The
NEVADA DUSTERS
The Story of a Major League Baseball Franchise
A companion site of
FOR A LIST OF PLAYER PROFILES, SEE BELOW.
(A PLAYER PROFILE IS FOUND ON EVERY SERIES RECAP PAGE.)
This companion site of THAT'S BASEBALL is probably of little interest to anyone but myself. It chronicles the "history" of a fictional  franchise, the Nevada Dusters, in what might be called an "alternate baseball universe." The "history" is derived through simulated games played using Baseball Mogul. Recording the results here (1) gives me a creative outlet as I try to make the "history" as interesting and realistic as possible, and (2) serves to promote the playing of Baseball Mogul, which I encourage others to try.
Along the way you can read all about the REAL history of the game at That's Baseball. For every year that the Dusters battle in the alternate universe you can find out What Really Happened in that year.
Why does the "history" of the Nevada Dusters begin in 1963? Because that's the first year for which sufficient data exists to allow me to produce the Game Logs. (Baseball History: What Really Happened: Game Logs.) To bring the Dusters up to just 2005 will entail playing, and recording the results of, 7,000 simulated games. (I don't simulate entire seasons in Baseball Mogul; playing each game -- and making the necessary lineup and roster adjustments -- will improve one's overall win-loss record.)
And why am I doing this, you ask? Don't I have a life? Sure I do. Baseball is life. If you're still reading this, you must agree.
If you've played Baseball Mogul or have taken the time to read the user manual -- available on this site (use the link, above) -- you know that a player manages all the details involved in running an MLB franchise. The game utilizes real players and historical statistics for its simulations. (Though I should point out here that you can significantly alter those stats by the managing techniques you employ.) The player can create a new team or acquire an existing one. But it's best when creating a team to eliminate a real one, so I "acquired" the Milwaukee Braves, moved them to Las Vegas, Nevada, and then proceeded to trade away most of the Braves roster to get the players I wanted. Rather than simply eliminating Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews and company, I scattered them around the league, trading them for my chosen players. As an added challenge I opted to shoot for the lowest team payroll in the majors. (And I almost succeeded, see the April 1963 Recap: Finances.) I did not want to pick a "super team," but, naturally, I did enjoy the advantage of hindsight in picking the roster.
It probably goes without saying, but you need three things to excel in baseball -- (1) good pitching, (2) good hitting, (3) and good defense. It's hard to put all three together, and in Baseball Mogul you usually don't create an offensive powerhouse without spending more money than I had alloted myself. I realized early on I would need to rely on good pitching and defense to keep my opponents from scoring a lot of runs.
As for the pitching, I could afford one established ace (Steve Barber), several up-and-coming talents (Dave McNally, Joe Horlen and Al Downing) and a couple of unproven youngsters (Pete Richert and Dwight Siebler) I thought would develop into winners. I had several relievers in mind who would make for a superior bullpen -- Hal Reniff, Claude Raymond and Bob Duliba. (Not that I'd be able to keep all of them in coming years.) Defense was the principal reason for the selections of catcher Johnny Roseboro, second baseman Jerry Adair and third baseman Clete Boyer. Backup infielders J. C. Martin, Bob Saverine and Vic Power were quality defensive players. Offensively, I hoped teaming outfielder Lee Maye and shortstop Jim Fregosi with future Hall-of Famer "Sweet Swingin'" Billy Williams would deliver the goods.
A few of my picks were sentimental, long-time favorites of mine -- Power, on the downside of his career but still capable of generating clutch hits and, as a seven-time Gold Glove winner, a skilled backup infielder; center fielder Albie Pearson, a former Rookie of the Year; and first-sacker Donn Clendenon.
In terms of my AAA picks I allowed myself one future superstar hitter, Willie Horton, and pitcher, Mickey Lolich, along with players like Denis Menke and Wally Bunker who would develop, over time, into quality performers.
The roster worked out like this:
BATTERS
Starting Lineup
Backups
AAA
C
Johnny Roseboro
J.C. Martin
Doug Camilli
1B
Donn Clendenon
Vic Power
Ed Kranepool
2B
Jerry Adair
Bob Saverine
Denis Menke
3B
Clete Boyer
Bob Bailey
SS
Jim Fregosi
Julio Gotay
RF
Lee Maye
George Banks
Bob Perry
CF
Albie Pearson
Gary Kolb
Ty Cline / Rico Carty
LF
Billy Williams
Willie Horton
PITCHERS
SP
Steve Barber
Joe Horlen
Dave McNally
Al Downing
Pete Richert
RP
Hal Reniff
Claude Raymond
Bob Duliba
Bill Dailey
Dave DeBusschere
Jack Spring / Jim Brewer
AAA
P
Mickey Lolich
Wally Bunker
Dwight Siebler
Bill Faul / Joe Hoerner
Chris Zachary /
Denny McLain
Players in gray were traded in early 1963 while the players listed after those traded were acquired after Opening Day.
After picking the roster it was a matter of establishing the starting lineup, rotation, bench, bullpen, and assigning the rest to AAA; determining strategies for pitching, batting, running, defense and substitutions; determining the budget for the farm system, the scouting team and the medical division; and establishing ticket and concession prices at the home field.
The Nevada Dusters were ready to embark on their inaugural season.... click here

most recent game played:
September 30, 1963

1963
April     May    June    July    August     September     October

1964


1965
1966
1967
1968
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1971
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1973
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2005
2006



PLAYER PROFILES
1963